Annual Vermont Cheesemakers Festival Coming July 25

July 14, 2010  
Filed under Things to do

Close to 100 cheesemakers and other artisan food producers will take part in the second annual Vermont Cheesemakers Festival in Shelburne. Hosted by the Vermont Butter & Cheese Company and the Vermont Cheese Council, the Festival will take place at Shelburne Farms from 10:30 a.m.-4:30 pm. The event, which is open to the public, attracted over 1,100 visitors from across the country last year.

This year’s attendees will sample over 100 types of cheese from 50 different cheesemakers, a variety of locally produced wines and beers, and several other artisan foods, including maple syrup, honey, chocolates, baked goods, and more. The Festival will also feature three tasting seminars, a cheesemaking demonstration, and a cooking show.

Among the “big cheeses” taking part in this year’s Festival will be:
• Sean Buchanan, Executive Chef, Stowe Mountain Lodge, Vermont;
• Steve Jenkins, Cheesemonger and author of several books including The Food Life and the best-selling Cheese Primer;
• Kate Arding, Cheesemonger and co-founder of Culture, the premier cheese magazine;
• Janet Fletcher, Food writer and author of 18 books on food and wine including The Niman Ranch Cookbook, The Cheese Course, and the Four Seasons Pasta;
• Marc Druart, Master Cheesemaker at the Vermont Institute for Artisan Cheese;
• Robin Schempp, Culinologist and President, Right Stuff Enterprise, Waterbury, Vermont.
Sean Buchanan will lead a cooking demonstration on ways to incorporate cheese and other local products into cooking. Kate Arding and Marc Druart will introduce visitors to the basics of cheesemaking, while Steven Jenkins will lead a panel discussion on the ins and outs of artisan cheesemaking.  Janet Fletcher will educate attendees on the best wine and cheese pairings.

“Vermont’s artisan food industry has become one of the most well-established and highly recognized in the country,” said Allison Hooper, co-owner of Vermont Butter & Cheese Company. “The Festival allows us to showcase some of Vermont’s best products, and judging by last year’s record attendance, there is definitely a growing interest in this type of hand-crafted and locally produced food.”

“Many of the cheesemakers and other artisan food producers are running small operations,” said Laini Fondiller, President of the Vermont Cheese Council. “This Festival provides them with a unique chance to reach consumers from across the country, helping to increase recognition of their products and grow their businesses.”

On Saturday, July 24, the day before the Festival, more than 20 creameries, vineyards, and breweries state-wide will participate in Vermont Artisan Food Open Studio Day. Open Studio Day includes special tours and tastings and gives travelers a great reason to spend a weekend of artisan food discovery in Vermont.
Tickets are available at http://www.vtcheesefest.com/ for $30 each.

For further information or to attend the Festival, contact: Elizabeth Davis, Boardman Davis Communications 802-598-7155 or edavis@boardmandavis.com.

From Cruises to Kayaks Fun on Vermont’s Waterways

July 13, 2010  
Filed under Things to do

From leisurely wildlife-viewing paddles in inlets and bays to cruise ships on Lake Champlain, one of the best ways to experience summer in Vermont is on the water. The following are just a few of the options for getting out, cooling off, and enjoying the season.
Glen Findholt offers tours on his vintage sloop, Friend Ship. “It’s a way to experience Lake Champlain the way people experienced it in the early twentieth century,” he said. “It’s a little more intimate than other ways to get out on the lake.”
For those looking for more than just a passive cruise, Findholt allows visitors to help out with the rigging and take a role in sailing the sloop. In addition to the Friend Ship, the Spirit of Ethan Allen offers narrated cruises four times a day from May through October. There are a variety of themed cruises including those devoted to Caribbean music, jazz, lobster dinners, and a murder mystery. Northern Lights also offers lunch, brunch and scenic cruises. All three cruise ships leave from Burlington.
For those looking for a more active way to enjoy the water, there is always sailing. Robin Doyle of the International Sailing School (ISS) refers to sailing as a lifelong sport which can be learned at any age. “It keeps you young in body and spirit,” she said. “It’s a wonderful retirement sport.”
The ISS offers a series of classes for those who just want to rent a boat for a short trip on the lake as well as those who dream of lengthy getaways. Doyle said the difference between older and younger first-timers is that seniors sometimes prefer a more comfortable boat than the Solings which are traditionally used for lessons. However, she has not found that older students have more fear than their younger counterparts. If anything, Doyle said, older students are more motivated. “…They want to get their dreams fulfilled.”
Doyle doesn’t see age or reduced stamina as a drawback to learning to sail. “It’s like skiing,” she said, “you can get in shape just by doing it, but staying in shape certainly helps.”
If sailing is too intimidating or expensive, there are always canoes and kayaks. Craig Richardson of Umiak Outdoor Outfitters said the number one criterion for more mature paddlers getting into these crafts is the weight of the boat. For that reason, if you are taking to the water for the first time, you might tend to favor kayaks over canoes which may be easier to lift on and off your car. Richardson recommends that folks purchase kayak carts that allow you to wheel your craft to and from the water. The Paddleboy cart is the most popular of the carts sold at Umiak.
Richardson said older kayakers tend to prefer kayaks with large openings which prevent them from feeling claustrophic or trapped and allow easy entry and exit. A popular model is the Wilderness System Pungo which is 12 feet long and weighs 40 pounds. Richardson noted that although shorter boats may be lighter, they usually don’t track as well. Wider boats are generally more stable.
Richardson said the most important additional pieces of equipment are a paddle and a personal floatation device (PFD). Those starting out in the sport generally favor lighter paddles which are made of fiberglass. Richardson said newer PFDs have mesh covering the lower portion of the back. This makes the jacket more comfortable on a warm day and also matches up against the backrest of recreational kayaks like the Pungo. In contrast, a foam-backed jacket can get wedged up against a seat and cause discomfort. Although Umiak recommends that all kayakers wear spray skirts, Richardson said older adults generally find them too confining and purchase splash decks instead. Splash decks are made of waterproof nylon and have a long zipper. They function as half a spray skirt which can protect kayakers from both water and the sun. Richardson also recommends the purchase of a pump to help get water out if the boat were to capsize.
Jane Yagoda, owner of True North Kayak Tours, said many of her clients are in their late 50s and early 60s; some have kayaked for years, while others are new to the sport. Yagoda said she provides lessons on how to perform solo and two-person rescues, as well as how to execute a move called an Eskimo roll which involves deliberately rolling the boat upside down and back again. The oldest person she has seen master the roll was 68. Yagoda recommends that even experienced paddlers practice rescues on a regular basis. She noted that some strength is needed for kayaking but in many cases, smarts will compensate for lack of strength. “Get the right equipment,” she said, “take some lessons, keep your eye on the weather and don’t go out alone.”
Vermonters don’t have to head out on the Almost Great Lake to enjoy the water. There are numerous smaller lakes and ponds including Joe’s Pond in Danville, Lake Iroquois in Williston and Hinesburg, Lake Dunmore in Salisbury and Lake Willoughby in Westmore. Paddling is also possible on many sections of the Lamoille, Mad and Winooski rivers. Bird watchers will enjoy the Missisquoi River in Swanton, Dead Creek in Addison and Little Otter Creek in Ferrisburgh.
Jeremy Brooks, owner of Brooks to Bays Nature Tours, leads canoe and kayak tours in marshy areas and on rivers. Although some of his customers have been paddling all their lives, others are beginners so Brooks takes time to make sure that people are comfortable in their boats. Many of Brooks’ customers are seniors; his oldest customer is 89 years old. Since Brooks trailers his fleet of boats, he can take his customers anywhere, but some favorite locations are the Missisquoi Bay and Dead Creek. Although he has enough boats for 18 clients, most of Brooks’ outings are with more intimate groups of four. “In Vermont, we’re blessed to have nature in our backyard,” he said. “Every trip is something new and different. You see things you’d never know were there if you were just driving by.”
Brooks hopes his trips are also an educational experience. “I’ve never had a tour where nobody learned something,” he said. “Even if you forget three-fourths of what you’ve seen, you will go home with something new.”
To learn more:
The Friend Ship – www.whistlingman.com
The Spirit of Ethan Allen – www.soea.com
Northern Lights – www.lakechamplaincruises.com
International Sailing School – www.vermontsailingschool.com
Canoe and Kayak Rentals – www.voga.org/water_activities.htm#Guide%20Services
True North Kayak Tours – www.vermontkayak.com/
Brooks to Bay Nature Tours – www.brookstobays.com

Champlain Valley Fair Means Music, Food and ‘Fun Guaranteed’

July 13, 2010  
Filed under Things to do

A new slogan, great free entertainment and a stellar lineup of musical acts – plus a scrumptious array of Fair food – highlight the 2010 edition of the Champlain Valley Fair. This year’s Fair begins on Saturday, Aug. 28 to Monday, Sept. 6 in Essex Junction.

This year’s slogan, “Fun Guaranteed – If We Don’t Put a Smile on Your Face, Your Next Visit’s on Us!” reiterates the Champlain Valley Fair’s commitment to providing a great experience for fairgoers. Champlain Valley Exposition staff will meet with anyone who has encountered an issue that prevents them from having a great time. In consideration of the feedback that is shared by the fairgoer, they will receive a complimentary admission for their next visit. This marks a longstanding belief that the Fair wants to make every visit as enjoyable as possible to those who come through the gates, and will go the extra mile to see that any problems are resolved.

Fantastic midway rides, including two roller coasters, are provided for the 31st year by Reithoffer Shows. The popular ride Speed, which hurls riders more than 60 mph over a 120-foot arc, will be back. A wide variety of fair food, including local treats like corn on the cob, smoked meat and maple cotton candy, will be on hand for hungry visitors. And for shoppers, the air conditioned comfort of the Robert E. Miller Expo Centre will house hundreds of vendors.

Free entertainment, including the U.S. Marine Corps Marching Band, will be featured around the Exposition, as well as acts like The Dazzling Mills Family jugglers, Dock Dogs, Anastasini Family Circus in the Big Top Tent, Draft Horses, Racing Pigs, and much more. Once on the fairgrounds, visitors can expect to be amazed and delighted by the variety and skill of the entertainment on hand.

Competitive exhibits continue to draw entries from all over the northeast, just as they have since the fair began in 1922. Blue ribbons are awarded in dozens of categories, including art, fruits and vegetables, flowers and Bonsai, cattle, horse, pony and oxen pulling, home crafts, fine arts, sheep, poultry and rabbits. In addition, the culinary department offers bakers a chance to show their talents in a range of competitions, including cookies, pies and breads. Chili lovers will also get a chance to shine, as well as youth bakers in the “ugly cake” decorating contest.

The Coca Cola Grandstand will be the site of some of the biggest names in entertainment at the Fair in 2010. On opening night, Lyle Lovett and his Large Band will take to the Comcast Stage to provide a unique musical kickoff for the Fair. Country music fans will have their day – and then some – on Sunday, Aug. 29, as the WOKO Country Club Music Festival offers an incredible lineup of artists over six hours. Headlining the festival is Trace Atkins, who is joined by top acts Aaron Tippin, Gwen Sebastian and Love and Theft during the afternoon. Local favorites Jamie Lee Thurston and Keegan Nolan will also appear. The Bud Light Music Series continues on Labor Day Weekend as teen sensation Justin Bieber will perform on Friday night, Sept. 3. On Saturday, Sept. 4, country superstar Keith Urban will be the headliner, joined by American Idol winner Kris Allen. The series finishes with comedian Bill Cosby on Sunday, Sept. 5. Tickets for all shows are available at the Flynn Box Office. Tickets purchased in advance include free gate admission to the Fair the day of the show. Tickets are available online at flynntix.org or by calling (802) 86-FLYNN (863-5966).

Motor sports take center stage for three days of the fair. On Tuesday, Aug. 31, A Night of Fire & Destruction highlights automotive destruction. Monster Trucks, cars, motorcycles, ATVs, and a 30-foot robot named “Transtormer” combine for a fiery smash-up in the Coca Cola Grandstand. Wednesday, Sept. 1 features the Earth Waste Systems Demolition Derby, and Monday, Sept. 8 is the Dixie Chopper Grand National Tractor & Truck Pull. Tickets for all events (which do NOT include gate admission to the Fair) are available at flynntix.org.

The Champlain Valley Fair, presented by Progressive, runs Aug. 28 to Sept. 7 from 10 a.m. to midnight. Gate admission is just $10 for adults, $5 children, kids under 5 are free. Convenient on-site parking is just $5 per vehicle. Special deals for group, advance and seniors – buy early and save when you get your tickets before the Fair. Get great discounts when you buy at Price Chopper stores.

The Champlain Valley Fair in Essex Junction – it’s “Fun Guaranteed.” For more information, visit cvexpo.org or call (802) 878-5545.

From Cruises to Kayaks: Fun On Vermont’s Waterways

July 13, 2010  
Filed under Health & Wellness

By Phyl Newbeck

From leisurely wildlife-viewing paddles in inlets and bays to cruise ships on Lake Champlain, one of the best ways to experience summer in Vermont is on the water. The following are just a few of the options for getting out, cooling off, and enjoying the season.

Glen Findholt offers tours on his vintage sloop, Friend Ship. “It’s a way to experience Lake Champlain the way people experienced it in the early twentieth century,” he said. “It’s a little more intimate than other ways to get out on the lake.”

For those looking for more than just a passive cruise, Findholt allows visitors to help out with the rigging and take a role in sailing the sloop. In addition to the Friend Ship, the Spirit of Ethan Allen offers narrated cruises four times a day from May through October. There are a variety of themed cruises including those devoted to Caribbean music, jazz, lobster dinners, and a murder mystery. Northern Lights also offers lunch, brunch and scenic cruises. All three cruise ships leave from Burlington.

For those looking for a more active way to enjoy the water, there is always sailing. Robin Doyle of the International Sailing School (ISS) refers to sailing as a lifelong sport which can be learned at any age. “It keeps you young in body and spirit,” she said. “It’s a wonderful retirement sport.”

The ISS offers a series of classes for those who just want to rent a boat for a short trip on the lake as well as those who dream of lengthy getaways. Doyle said the difference between older and younger first-timers is that seniors sometimes prefer a more comfortable boat than the Solings which are traditionally used for lessons. However, she has not found that older students have more fear than their younger counterparts. If anything, Doyle said, older students are more motivated. “…They want to get their dreams fulfilled.”

Doyle doesn’t see age or reduced stamina as a drawback to learning to sail. “It’s like skiing,” she said, “you can get in shape just by doing it, but staying in shape certainly helps.”

If sailing is too intimidating or expensive, there are always canoes and kayaks. Craig Richardson of Umiak Outdoor Outfitters said the number one criterion for more mature paddlers getting into these crafts is the weight of the boat. For that reason, if you are taking to the water for the first time, you might tend to favor kayaks over canoes which may be easier to lift on and off your car. Richardson recommends that folks purchase kayak carts that allow you to wheel your craft to and from the water. The Paddleboy cart is the most popular of the carts sold at Umiak.

Richardson said older kayakers tend to prefer kayaks with large openings which prevent them from feeling claustrophic or trapped and allow easy entry and exit. A popular model is the Wilderness System Pungo which is 12 feet long and weighs 40 pounds. Richardson noted that although shorter boats may be lighter, they usually don’t track as well. Wider boats are generally more stable.

Richardson said the most important additional pieces of equipment are a paddle and a personal floatation device (PFD). Those starting out in the sport generally favor lighter paddles which are made of fiberglass. Richardson said newer PFDs have mesh covering the lower portion of the back. This makes the jacket more comfortable on a warm day and also matches up against the backrest of recreational kayaks like the Pungo. In contrast, a foam-backed jacket can get wedged up against a seat and cause discomfort. Although Umiak recommends that all kayakers wear spray skirts, Richardson said older adults generally find them too confining and purchase splash decks instead. Splash decks are made of waterproof nylon and have a long zipper. They function as half a spray skirt which can protect kayakers from both water and the sun.

Richardson also recommends the purchase of a pump to help get water out if the boat were to capsize.
Jane Yagoda, owner of True North Kayak Tours, said many of her clients are in their late 50s and early 60s; some have kayaked for years, while others are new to the sport. Yagoda said she provides lessons on how to perform solo and two-person rescues, as well as how to execute a move called an Eskimo roll which involves deliberately rolling the boat upside down and back again. The oldest person she has seen master the roll was 68. Yagoda recommends that even experienced paddlers practice rescues on a regular basis. She noted that some strength is needed for kayaking but in many cases, smarts will compensate for lack of strength. “Get the right equipment,” she said, “take some lessons, keep your eye on the weather and don’t go out alone.”

Vermonters don’t have to head out on the Almost Great Lake to enjoy the water. There are numerous smaller lakes and ponds including Joe’s Pond in Danville, Lake Iroquois in Williston and Hinesburg, Lake Dunmore in Salisbury and Lake Willoughby in Westmore. Paddling is also possible on many sections of the Lamoille, Mad and Winooski rivers. Bird watchers will enjoy the Missisquoi River in Swanton, Dead Creek in Addison and Little Otter Creek in Ferrisburgh.

Jeremy Brooks, owner of Brooks to Bays Nature Tours, leads canoe and kayak tours in marshy areas and on rivers. Although some of his customers have been paddling all their lives, others are beginners so Brooks takes time to make sure that people are comfortable in their boats. Many of Brooks’ customers are seniors; his oldest customer is 89 years old. Since Brooks trailers his fleet of boats, he can take his customers anywhere, but some favorite locations are the Missisquoi Bay and Dead Creek. Although he has enough boats for 18 clients, most of Brooks’ outings are with more intimate groups of four. “In Vermont, we’re blessed to have nature in our backyard,” he said. “Every trip is something new and different. You see things you’d never know were there if you were just driving by.”

Brooks hopes his trips are also an educational experience. “I’ve never had a tour where nobody learned something,” he said. “Even if you forget three-fourths of what you’ve seen, you will go home with something new.”

To learn more:
The Friend Ship – www.whistlingman.com
The Spirit of Ethan Allen – www.soea.com
Northern Lights – www.lakechamplaincruises.com
International Sailing School – www.vermontsailingschool.com
Canoe and Kayak Rentals – www.voga.org/water_activities.htm#Guide%20Services
True North Kayak Tours – www.vermontkayak.com/
Brooks to Bay Nature Tours – www.brookstobays.com

Miracle Method Surface Refinishing Featured on ‘Today Show’

July 8, 2010  
Filed under Business

Miracle Method Surface Refinishing and its bathroom and kitchen makeover service was featured on NBC’s Today Show recently. Al Roker, the Today Show’s weatherman and feature reporter, along with home improvement expert Lou Manfredini, talked about the benefits of refinishing and how Miracle Method can make dated bathtubs, tile and countertops look new again.

The two also discussed how surface refinishing keeps perfectly restorable bathtubs, tile, vanities and kitchen countertops out of landfills. In the last year, Miracle Method kept nearly 2,000,000 cubic feet of worn bathtubs, tile and countertops out of landfills. Local Miracle Method owner Doug Painter estimated he has saved more than 100 tons from going to the landfill.

Miracle Method provided a sample before-and-after bathtub and company Marketing Director Don Dominick traveled to New York for the show. “It was great to have Miracle Method recognized on national television as the best,” says Dominick about the experience.

In business for over thirty years, Miracle Method is the nation’s largest surface refinishing network. By refinishing all types of tubs, showers, tile and countertops, Miracle Method can change colors, extend the life of the fixture for 15 years or more, and save up to 75 percent compared to traditional replacement costs. The company provides its surface refinishing services to homeowners, hotels, university housing, hospitals and property managers.

To learn more about Miracle Method and to see samples of their work, log on to www.miraclemethod.com or call Doug Painter at Miracle Method’s Vermont location at 985-5551.

Colburn and Slayton Exhibition Opens at the Fleming Museum

July 8, 2010  
Filed under Arts & Entertainment

The Fleming Museum is proud to present the work of Vermont artists Francis Colburn (1909-1984) and Ronald Slayton (1910-1992), in celebration of the one-hundredth anniversary of their births. The special exhibition is titled “A Centennial Celebration: The Art of Francis Colburn and Ronald Slayton.” Longtime friends, the two artists exhibited widely in group exhibitions throughout their long careers, however, they have never been the sole focus of an exhibition together. Their work has not been seen in this magnitude for over twenty years.

A 1934 alumnus of the University of Vermont (UVM), Francis Colburn embarked on an artistic career at the Arts Students League in New York, eventually returning to UVM, where he served as artist-in-residence and established the University’s Art Department. Also affiliated with UVM, albeit briefly, Ronald Slayton was enrolled at the University for the 1935-36 academic year. He left and joined Francis Colburn in the federally funded Works Progress Administration project (WPA), which ran from 1935 to 1943. The two artists are among the few native Vermonters to have participated in this government project.

Themes common to both Colburn’s and Slayton’s work produced during this period reflect a socially activist spirit, expressing sympathy with the labor movement and exhibiting an affinity for left-wing politics ranging from New Deal liberalism to socialism and communism. Although Slayton consistently used art to promote social change, he also responded to the beauty of the world around him through colors and forms that reflect an intense interior vision. Colburn also diverged from his socially driven art of the 1930s and 1940s to experiment with Surrealism, making him one of the first native-born Vermont artists to respond to European Modernism.

The exhibition, consisting of over 50 paintings, drawings, watercolors, and prints, will close on August 29.
For more information on Fleming Museum visit www.flemingmuseum.org or call 656-0750.

Air Supply Returns to Charts with New Single ‘Dance With Me’

July 8, 2010  
Filed under Arts & Entertainment

Air Supply’s millions of fans around the world know the legendary hit-making duo is far from “All Out of Love”—in fact, they’re back on the Adult Contemporary charts for the first time in many years with “Dance With Me,” the first single from their Odds On Records debut “Mumbo Jumbo.”

Just weeks after composer and vocalist Graham Russell was honored with a BMI Million-Air Certificate recognizing 3 million performances of the duo’s hit “All Out Of Love,” Air Supply’s new song was the number one most added track on the FMQB AC40 Chart, number three most added on the R&R (Radio and Records) AC Chart and number two most added on the Mediabase AC chart.

Many of the superstars Graham Russell and Russell Hitchcock are sharing chart space with weren’t even born when the duo was scoring its most enduring early 80s hits like “Lost In Love,” “Making Love Out of Nothing At All” and “The One That You Love.”

Mumbo Jumbo is Air Supply’s first studio album of all original material since 2002’s “Across The Concrete Sky.”

Air Supply is touring the U.S. this year. The tour includes a stop at the Theatre at Westbury in Westbury, New York on July 22.

For more info on the band, visit www.airsupplymusic.com.

Small Creates Sculpting Career After ‘Retirement’

July 8, 2010  
Filed under Arts & Entertainment

By Stephanie Choate

Peter Small discovered his knack for sculpture when he took a pottery class shortly after retiring 20 years ago.
“It was like putting a shovel in the ground and finding gold,” the Williston resident said. “Once I got started, there was no stopping me.”

Small and his wife, Beatrice, moved to Williston from upstate New York three years ago. The walls of their Michael Lane home are covered with paintings and sculptures on pedestals, some of which are Small’s.
Small makes about 30 sculptures a year, which sell for between $250 and $5,000, depending on the work.
“I like the fact that (sculpture) is very tactile and that I have ways to create what I imagine,” he said.

Many of Small’s sculptures are elaborate heads or torsos with interesting designs or textures. He also made a series where he recreated figures by famous artists, including Edvard Munch and Paul Gauguin.

Lately, though, Small has been working on pieces that show figures interacting with each other, like a recent piece depicting two wrestlers.

“It was a very complicated piece with arms and legs going in every direction,” he said. “It really came out the way I hoped.”

Small said one of the highlights of his sculpting career was when Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts curator Elizabeth Sussman chose him as one of the 80 artists in a show at the Katonah Museum of Art in New York. More than 1,500 people applied for the positions.

“That sort of gave me affirmation,” he said.

Small said he is hoping to find a gallery to display and sell his work.

“That would be nice,” he said. “At this point I would rather sculpt than merchandise my own
work.”

Red Stage Theatre Company Begins Second Season

July 8, 2010  
Filed under Arts & Entertainment

Red Stage will produce two plays in repertory during the month of August at the Main Street Landing Black Box in Burlington.

The first show is the amazing “Spring Awakening,” written by Frank Wedekind. The play was recently turned into a Broadway musical that won the Tony for Best Musical in 2009.

“Spring Awakening” traces the dawning sexual awareness of four youths. Despite the recent success of the musical based on the play, “Spring Awakening” closed after one night in New York in 1917 amid public outrage and charges of obscenity. But even more radical is the unsentimental and brutal comedy with which Wedekind treated it.

The second show is a new play written by Rutgers Playwriting MFA Candidate Josh Levine called “Game Over.” A brutal and darkly comic play, it gives us a glimpse at the intimacy sometimes achieved in the most terrifying and savage of places. Two soldiers, Marcus and Jimmy, return from Iraq and must face the task of reconciling the bond formed overseas with their ever-differing reactions to the war. But, for these two friends, the road back to “normal” is just as explosive and unpredictable as the war itself. Red Stage is excited to perform the East Coast premiere of this startling and exciting new play.

To fulfill its social mission, Red Stage is working closely with the United States Refugee Institution to collaborate in hosting multiple workshops for children from the various populations to help them explore their own cultural stories through theatre. For more information, visit www.redstagetheatre.org or call Red Stage Theatre Company, 802-318-7935.

Summer Concert Series at the Essex Shoppes Pavilion

July 8, 2010  
Filed under Arts & Entertainment

Phoenix Books and the Essex Shoppes and Cinema have partnered to produce a month-long music series celebrating local musicians. Attendees are encouraged to bring a blanket and gather ‘round the gazebo every Wednesday in July (and one Saturday) for relaxing musical journeys.
The series will include:

• Wednesday, July 14 at 7p.m.: Jacob & Rachel
A program of light, inspirational music featuring a few of their own compositions as well as a mix of light pop and Contemporary Christian hits.

• Wednesday, July 21 at 7p.m.:  Green Mountain Swing
A 17-piece big band featuring hits of the thirties, forties, and fifties.

• Saturday, July 24 at noon:  Gigi & Joni
Gigi Weisman and Joni AvRutick perform original and traditional songs for children and families; their music is playful and poetic, concerning themes of friendship, community, and the environment.

• July 28 at 7p.m.: Summer Songwriter’s Show
Folk, jazz, blues, and bluegrass styles with a wry New England sensibility and the smoldering voices of Rachel Hamilton, Carol Ann Jones, and Rebecca Padula.

For more information,visit http://phoenixbooks.biz or call 872-7111.

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