To Shred, or Not to Shred?

January 26, 2017  
Filed under Blogs

EVERYDAY CHEAPSKATE
BY MARY HUNT

Can someone legally dig through your trash looking for credit card receipts, account numbers or even your Social Security number? In the decision of California v. Greenwood, the U.S. Supreme Court stated that the “expectation of privacy in trash left for collection in an area accessible to the public” is unreasonable.

In other words, when you throw something in your trash and then drag the container to the street for pickup, it is available to anyone willing to overlook the disgusting smells and textures within.
Think that doesn’t happen? It has. It does. And sadly, it will continue.
WHY SHRED
In 2015, more than 13 million people fell victim to identity theft felonies in the U.S.
Identity fraud is a serious issue — this band of thieves has reportedly stolen $112 billion in the past six years. That equals $35,600 stolen per minute, or enough to pay for four years of college every four minutes.
Some of these victims could have prevented this from happening by simply shredding their identifying documents.
If you do not know how to effectively shred your most important documents, it’s time to learn.
WHAT TO SHRED
The rule of thumb is to shred any paper or document that contains personally identifying information, such as your signature, name, address, phone number, Social Security number, account number and any other information that is uniquely yours. That means anything and everything — the address labels on junk mail and magazines, luggage tags, pay stubs, ATM recipes, airline tickets, photocopies of birth certificates, expired passports and tax returns older than three years. When in doubt, err on the side of shredding.
HOW TO SHRED
As difficult as it is for me to imagine, some shredded documents can be reconstructed through painstaking tedious work by motivated identity thieves who have pressure-sensitive tape. If the shred strips a machine produces are fairly large, that is yet another potential hazard. To that end, tearing up your documents before you put them into the trash is a total waste of time. Even a child could put those pieces back together.
BEST INEXPENSIVE HOME SHREDDERS
My pick for the best inexpensive shredder is AmazonBasics 8-Sheet High-Security Micro-Cut Paper, CD and Credit Card Shredder with Pullout Basket. This model produces almost confetti-like shreds and operates for up to two minutes before needing a 40-minute cooldown. You can shred a lot in two minutes! And it will shred credit cards and CDs one at a time. It costs about $70.
Shredding, while mandatory for the paper in your life, doesn’t address private information in the hands of merchants and service providers and on social media. That’s where LifeLock Identity Theft Protection comes in to protect you.
Mary invites questions, comments and tips at mary@everydaycheapskate.com, or c/o Everyday Cheapskate, 12340 Seal Beach Blvd., Suite B-416, Seal Beach, CA 90740. This column will answer questions of general interest, but letters cannot be answered individually. Mary Hunt is the founder of www.DebtProofLiving.com, a personal finance member website and the author of “Debt-Proof Living,” released in 2014. To find out more about Mary and read her past columns, please visit the Creators Syndicate webpage at www.creators.com.
COPYRIGHT 2016 CREATORS.COM

 

 

7 Places to Look forFree Money

January 25, 2017  
Filed under Blogs

EVERYDAY CHEAPSKATE
BY MARY HUNT

Recently, I read about a guy who has a hobby of looking for money in gutters, parking lots and other public places and keeps a running tab. He routinely finds over $100 in a year. Not bad! Just imagine if he knew about other places that harbor free money for the taking.

VENDING MACHINES. Start paying attention to vending machine coin-return compartments. Luckily, most of them are made of clear plastic so you can see into them without getting down and reaching around. Winter is the best time to clean up on coins, as people are often wearing gloves and don’t feel the coins they leave behind.
JUNK JEWELRY. Toured your jewelry box lately? Gather up all the broken chains, mateless earrings, bracelets, rings, etc. — all of that gold from the ’80s that you don’t wear anymore. If it’s at least 10K gold, it’s like cash. Go in person to three jewelry stores to see what they’ll pay you for a piece, and then go with the highest bidder. Never mail your junk gold to a gold dealer, and be wary of the popular gold parties.
PENSION FUNDS. If you or a family member worked for a company with a pension plan and were terminated because the company went bankrupt or was bought out, you may be eligible to receive benefits from the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation, or PBGC. In 2007, PBGC held $133 million in unclaimed benefits for 32,000 people. That averages nearly $4,200 per person. To see whether you have anything coming your way, search the PBGC database on its website.
MATURED BONDS. In 2014, about $16.1 billion worth of savings bonds had matured and were sitting unclaimed by their owners, according to the U.S. Treasury. The Treasury Hunt search engine allows you to search for matured bonds using your Social Security number.
UNCLAIMED ASSETS. You or someone in your family may be missing money because you lost track of a refund, rebate, security deposit, insurance dividend or proceeds from a class action suit. It happens. To search online, check out the government site www.usa.gov/unclaimed-money as well as Unclaimed.org and MissingMoney.com.
DRAWER PURGE. Everyone has at least one junk drawer. Go through yours on a gift-card hunt. Call the number on the back of the card to find out how much value remains. That’s cash being held hostage on plastic. Use it, or you may lose it.
TREASURE HUNTING. Remember that cool metal detector you got for your birthday umpteen years ago? Dust it off and take up metal detecting — a hobby where the more you participate, the luckier you’ll get. Want to increase the fun? Join a club. Find other enthusiasts. And make sure you keep a journal of your successes. For detecting how-tos, locations to hunt, forums and just plain fun for metal detectors, check out the 25 best metal detecting sites (www.kellycodetectors.com/catalog/library/25-best-sites).
Mary invites questions, comments and tips at mary@everydaycheapskate.com, or c/o Everyday Cheapskate, 12340 Seal Beach Blvd., Suite B-416, Seal Beach, CA 90740. This column will answer questions of general interest, but letters cannot be answered individually. Mary Hunt is the founder of www.DebtProofLiving.com, a personal finance member website and the author of “Debt-Proof Living,” released in 2014. To find out more about Mary and read her past columns, please visit the Creators Syndicate webpage at www.creators.com.
COPYRIGHT 2017 CREATORS.COM

 

 

 

Get the Maximum Burning Hours from Candles, Plus Other Great Tips

January 24, 2017  
Filed under Blogs

EVERYDAY CHEAPSKATE
BY MARY HUNT

Am I the only one who didn’t know that there’s a definite protocol for burning jar candles and pillar candles? I’ve made an ugly mess of so many candles in my life, only to toss them out long before their time. But no more. I’ve learned the secret to keeping large candles looking good and functional right down to the last bit.

HOUR-PER-INCH RULE. Although it is absolutely counterintuitive, burning a pillar candle or jar candle for at least an hour per inch of diameter each time you light it will give the candle many more burning hours over time. This way, the flame has enough time to melt the wax all the way to the outer edges, and the whole candle burns down efficiently. Each time you cut short a burning session, the flame only burns the wax in the center, which wastes the outer wax at that level.
HOTEL TRAVEL TIP. If you’ve ever left something behind in a hotel room, you are going to love this tip. Make this the first thing you do when you walk in your room: Take a hand towel from the bathroom and spread it out on the desk or another countertop. This becomes the de facto location for all of your things that you have a place for at home. Put your room key, car keys, sunglasses, chargers, wallet –everything — on the towel. Everything is visible in one spot, rather than scattered about the room. As you come and go, return these items to their place on the towel. When you’re ready to check out, there’s no searching needed and nothing left behind.
NONFOOD BARGAINS. Do not buy nonfood items, such as paper goods, garbage bags and cleaning supplies, at the grocery store. They can all be purchased for lower prices at discount stores like Target, Wal-Mart or Kmart. Grocery stores sell them thinking the convenience of buying these items at the same time you buy your food will make you not mind spending twice as much.
FRUGAL FOODIE. To stretch pricey ingredients like meat, avocados, cheese and nuts, dice or chop them and sprinkle them on top of your dish, rather than mixing them in. You’ll taste the yummy richness and flavor without having to use as much.
AN APEELING IDEA. A woman I know would clog the garbage disposal every year when she peeled the potatoes for Hanukkah latkes. It was as much a tradition as candles and gelt. She and her family thought it was just a quirk of her sink. Here’s the problem: Grinding potato peels in the disposal turns them into a mashed-like mass that’s almost guaranteed to clog any drain. An easy solution is to line your sink with newspaper (or a plastic bag), peel the potatoes onto the paper and then chuck the whole thing in the compost or trash.
BRING OUT THE BABY OIL. If your mascara seems to be dried out but you need to get a few more uses out of it, trickle a drop or two of baby oil on the wand and then mix it well. It should yield a few more coats of eyelash enhancement. (If the mascara is more than six months old, it should be replaced.)
Mary invites questions, comments and tips at mary@everydaycheapskate.com, or c/o Everyday Cheapskate, 12340 Seal Beach Blvd., Suite B-416, Seal Beach, CA 90740. This column will answer questions of general interest, but letters cannot be answered individually. Mary Hunt is the founder of www.DebtProofLiving.com, a personal finance member website and the author of “Debt-Proof Living,” released in 2014. To find out more about Mary and read her past columns, please visit the Creators Syndicate webpage at www.creators.com.
COPYRIGHT 2017 CREATORS.COM

 

 

 

5 Reasons to Give Kids an Allowance

January 23, 2017  
Filed under Blogs

EVERYDAY CHEAPSKATE
BY MARY HUNT

At the foundation of your children’s financial intelligence should be this undeniable truth: It is not the amount of money you have but what you do with it that matters. This is true for a child managing a $5 weekly allowance and a corporate executive with a $5,000 weekly salary.

For many years of my life, I didn’t know this truth. On the contrary, I believed that more money was the answer. I was convinced that if we just made more money, won the lottery or received some unexpected inheritance, all of our money problems would vanish. But the more we made, the worse our problems became. Because I didn’t know how to manage what we had, more would have never been enough. We didn’t save. We didn’t give. We didn’t plan. And we had no idea where all the money went.
Unless your children learn simple wise money management techniques, more money will never be enough.
The simplest way to get started building financial intelligence in your kids’ minds and hearts is by putting them on an allowance and requiring them to either suffer or enjoy the financial consequences of their decisions.
An allowance teaches kids about real life. With their own money, kids learn about responsibilities, consequences, saving and charity.
An allowance helps them learn how to distinguish needs from wants. Having their own money forces kids to think about what to spend it on.
An allowance puts an end to the nickel-and-diming. You create a set budget item called “Kids’ Allowances,” and that stops the constant drip, drip, drip of money flowing from your pocket and going toward random stuff for them.
An allowance builds trustworthiness. By giving kids money to manage, you demonstrate that you trust them. And they soon learn that to keep the money coming, they need to become trustworthy.
An allowance promotes self-confidence. Managing money has a magical effect on their self-esteem.
Want to get your child’s allowance program off to a great start? Consider the Moonjar Moneybox. This clever savings bank is actually three banks in one to teach children to save, spend and share their allowance.
Over the years, Moonjar (which is the creators’ names, Noom and Raj, spelled backward) has received multiple awards for innovation, and it’s no wonder. This money box is well-made and easy to use. Kids as young as 4 years old can understand and learn from the process. I believe this durable tin money box is a timeless gift that will inspire and teach children to save, spend and share wisely for a lifetime. It costs about $19.
Mary invites questions, comments and tips at mary@everydaycheapskate.com, or c/o Everyday Cheapskate, 12340 Seal Beach Blvd., Suite B-416, Seal Beach, CA 90740. This column will answer questions of general interest, but letters cannot be answered individually. Mary Hunt is the founder of www.DebtProofLiving.com, a personal finance member website and the author of “Debt-Proof Living,” released in 2014. To find out more about Mary and read her past columns, please visit the Creators Syndicate webpage at www.creators.com.
COPYRIGHT 2017 CREATORS.COM

 

 

 

‘Winter Brewfest’ offers indoor fun for Vermont brew lovers on Saturday, Feb. 11 in Burlington

 Winter-Brewfest-Logo (1)

‘Come shake off the winter blues!’

 

Vermont’s largest winter brewers’ festival premieres on Saturday, Feb. 11 at the Sheraton-Burlington, offering festival-goers samples from more than 75 varieties of Vermont craft beer, ciders, wine and spirits.

 

The state’s first major indoor winter brewers’ festival also offers music, food sampling, party games and more while featuring some of the finest brews in the world.

 

The event also includes food pairing workshops, party games including Giant Connect Four and Jenga, food sampling including That’s Different Chocolates, Potlicker Kitchen and many more.

 

The first session from 12-4 p.m. features live music by Renegade Groove, a four-piece funk rock band with a high-energy presence and an inclination for improvisation.

 

The second session from 6-10 p.m. kicks off with live music by The Grift. The independent Burlington-based band blends roots-rock and pop and jam, and its live shows are energetic and original, with band members swapping instruments and occasionally playing two at a time.

 

“This is a celebration of Vermont-made brews and ciders, as well as wine and spirits, and we have a terrific lineup for the event,” said Paul Apfelbaum, festival co-organizer. “We want to help people shake off the winter blues! We have something to satisfy everyone from the curious brew newbie to the connoisseur, as well as terrific local bands and other fun surprises.”

 

The 21-and-over event will be held on two floors at the Sheraton-Burlington Hotel & Conference Center. Tickets are $39, which includes 15 samples from a large selection of brews, wine and spirits, as well as free food samples offered by foodie exhibitors during the four-hour festival. There will also be food available for purchase.

 

To buy tickets or for more information, visit www.winterbrewfestvt.com

Follow the festival on Facebook at www.facebook.com/winterbrewfestvt/

 

 

 

 

 

Strike a Fiscal Balance With Your Grown Children

January 19, 2017  
Filed under Blogs

EVERYDAY CHEAPSKATE
BY MARY HUNT
It is difficult for parents to balance giving financial help to their adult children and allowing them independence, even if independence means hardship. I do not have all the answers. I struggle because I’m a mother and my mom heart wants to protect my children from every possible bump in the road of life.

My head, on the other hand, says that is absurd. Giving my boys all I can to make their lives perfect would deprive them of the joy of making it on their own — that feeling of accomplishment that comes when we figure out how to get through a difficult situation.
I know of a family that has a lot of money. They could not possibly spend it all in their lifetime. Consequently, out of love and generosity, the parents have provided everything for their children, who are now adults with kids of their own.
These parents have offered unbelievable support for their brood. They’ve purchased all of their homes and cars. They pay all the expenses and bills every month. They give their grown children more than enough money to live — and live well.
The children have never had jobs. They do nothing. They are takers because everything has always been taken care of for them. The parents have deprived their children of the gift of independence. They’ve turned them into greedy monsters for whom more will never be enough.
So where is the balance? Is it wrong for family members to help one another, especially during these difficult economic times? Of course not. But we need to set sensible boundaries. Here are some.
Do not go into debt to help. Whether it’s for a college education, to cosign a son or daughter’s legal obligation or to help with the purchase of a home, if you have to go into debt to come up with the funds, watch out. That’s a red flag that you’re setting yourself and your offspring up for a future financial disaster. How can you give money to others that is not yours to give? Going into debt to help another is not a loving thing to do.
Do not do too much to help. This is the most difficult for me to pen because I am the queen of doing too much. My motive is one of generosity and love. But that help becomes inappropriate when it stifles financial maturity or precludes the need for my sons to become self-reliant. How much is too much? I cannot make that determination for you. Your resources should be your first consideration, and then you must consider each situation carefully.
There’s a lesson to be learned from the way steel is made strong. It must be stressed sufficiently to become tempered. The same goes for the human spirit: The stresses of life make us stronger and prepare us for the future.
Shielding our adult children from financial stress is not always the most loving thing to do. In the end, it might do more harm than good.
Mary invites questions, comments and tips at mary@everydaycheapskate.com, or c/o Everyday Cheapskate, 12340 Seal Beach Blvd., Suite B-416, Seal Beach, CA 90740. This column will answer questions of general interest, but letters cannot be answered individually. Mary Hunt is the founder of www.DebtProofLiving.com, a personal finance member website and the author of “Debt-Proof Living,” released in 2014. To find out more about Mary and read her past columns, please visit the Creators Syndicate webpage at www.creators.com.
COPYRIGHT 2016 CREATORS.COM

 

 

 

Wednesday, January 18

January 18, 2017  
Filed under RESOURCE GUIDE

LESLIE’S TRIVIABITS (TM)
BY LESLIE ELMAN

John F. Kennedy did not go hatless to his presidential inauguration in 1961. He arrived wearing a black cutaway morning coat, a gray vest, striped trousers and a silk top hat. Outgoing president Dwight D. Eisenhower wore a top hat as well, after catching grief for wearing a Homburg hat to his own inauguration in 1957. Lyndon Baines Johnson wore a gray fedora when he was inaugurated in 1965. Richard Nixon was the last president to wear a top hat to his inauguration.

The toque blanche is a hat worn most often by what type of professionals?
A) Athletes
B) Chefs
C) Firefighters
D) Ranchers

Previous answer: The first ATM in the United States was installed in Rockville Centre, New York, in 1969.

TRIVIA FANS: Leslie Elman is the author of “Weird But True: 200 Astounding, Outrageous and Totally Off the Wall Facts.” Contact her at triviabitsleslie@gmail.com.
COPYRIGHT 2017 LESLIE ELMAN
DISTRIBUTED BY CREATORS.COM

Best Inexpensive Instant Pot and Smart TV, and Recipe for Vinyl Siding Cleaner, Too

January 18, 2017  
Filed under Blogs

EVERYDAY CHEAPSKATE
BY MARY HUNT

Dear Mary: I have always valued your comments about various products and can honestly say that I have never been disappointed in anything I bought after reading your recommendations. Have you done any research on the Instant Pot multifunctional pressure cookers? I was thinking one might be a good gift. Thank you so much. — Conni

Dear Conni: Thank you for your kind words and trust. It means the world to me.
Yes, I am very familiar with Instant Pot, a single electric appliance that functions as a pressure cooker, slow cooker, rice cooker, maker, steamer and warmer and also sautes and browns. Its onboard microprocessor (think computer) is programmed with adjustable cooking modes, up to 24 hours of delayed cooking and automatic keep-warm for up to 10 hours. When it comes to modern technology, Instant Pot is it. This appliance can turn out perfectly poached eggs in two to three minutes and baked potatoes in 12 minutes.
Instant Pot has the power to change your life. Really, I can’t say too many good things, and I agree wholeheartedly that an Instant Pot would make a wonderful gift for a very lucky foodie! While there are a number of different Instant Pot models, my pick for the best inexpensive option is the 6-quart 1,000-watt Instant Pot IP-DUO60 7-in-1 Multi Functional Pressure Cooker. It is sweet! It costs about $120.
Dear Mary: I have read your advice for years and gained so much from your tips. My husband and I are thinking of buying a big-screen TV. We have been told to get a smart one. Can you give me any recommendations? Thanks. — Judy
Dear Judy: I agree that if you’re going to invest in a new television, it really should be a smart TV, one that is internet-enabled and supports movie streaming from content providers, such as Netflix, Amazon and Hulu. These days, there are so many to choose from. They all have their own features, and prices range from as low as $150 for an entry-level 32-inch model up to $20,000 for an 88-inch curved screen model that broadcasts in 4K Ultra HD!
Here’s my advice: First, decide where you will put this television. That will help you determine the best size. Next, determine how much you are willing to spend. If you live within driving range of either Costco or Sam’s Club, go there. You can get a day pass if you are not a member, so you can look around. Talk with the folks in the TV department. You’ll learn a lot. And you’ll see some great prices for beautiful smart TVs.
With all of that said, if you would rather just order one online and have it delivered to your home with free shipping (like me), here’s my pick for the best inexpensive smart TV: the TCL 55-inch 4K Ultra HD Roku Smart LED TV. It’s a great TV for the price — about $400.
Need a bit more help? Amazon has introduced a great new online feature that will take all the guesswork out of finding the right TV for your needs. Check it out.
Dear Mary: I am looking for a formula to wash down a vinyl-sided house. I read about it here years ago. I recall that one of the ingredients was Spic and Span. I hope you can help. Thank you. — Connie
Dear Connie: I can — here it is:
VINYL SIDING CLEANER: You’ll need 2/3 cup Spic ‘n Span, 1/2 cup powdered Tide laundry detergent, 1 quart liquid chlorine bleach and 3 quarts very hot water. Mix ingredients very well in a 2-gallon bucket, and allow them to stand for 4 to 5 hours. Pour this concentrate into an ordinary hose-end garden sprayer set to the midpoint, and apply the cleaner to the vinyl siding. Leave solution on siding for five minutes, remove the sprayer, and rinse the siding well with a hose.
Hope that helps. Let me know how it works for you. By the way, you can always find past columns on the Everyday Cheapskate website. Use the handy search bar to type in a keyword.
Mary invites questions, comments and tips at mary@everydaycheapskate.com, or c/o Everyday Cheapskate, 12340 Seal Beach Blvd., Suite B-416, Seal Beach, CA 90740. This column will answer questions of general interest, but letters cannot be answered individually. Mary Hunt is the founder of www.DebtProofLiving.com, a personal finance member website and the author of “Debt-Proof Living,” released in 2014. To find out more about Mary and read her past columns, please visit the Creators Syndicate webpage at www.creators.com.
COPYRIGHT 2017 CREATORS.COM

 

Tuesday, January 17

January 17, 2017  
Filed under RESOURCE GUIDE

LESLIE’S TRIVIABITS (TM)
BY LESLIE ELMAN

As a courtesy to international visitors, and in preparation for the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo, Japanese banks are retooling their ATMs to make transactions in as many as 16 different languages. In addition to the Japanese and English you might expect, some bank ATMS will handle traditional Chinese, simplified Chinese, Korean, Thai, Malay, Filipino, Indonesian, Vietnamese, German, French, Portuguese, Spanish, Russian and Arabic.

The first ATM in the United States was installed in 1969 in what city?
A) Anaheim, California
B) Coppell, Texas
C) Rockville Centre, New York
D) Shaker Heights, Ohio

Previous answer: “Goody Two-Shoes” was a 1982 hit for Adam Ant.

TRIVIA FANS: Leslie Elman is the author of “Weird But True: 200 Astounding, Outrageous and Totally Off the Wall Facts.” Contact her at triviabitsleslie@gmail.com.
COPYRIGHT 2017 LESLIE ELMAN
DISTRIBUTED BY CREATORS.COM

A Homemade Gift You’d Actually Love to Receive

January 17, 2017  
Filed under Blogs

EVERYDAY CHEAPSKATE
BY MARY HUNT

With the biggest gifting season of the year behind us, you may be breathing a big sigh of relief, and rightly so. It feels great to know you have eleven months to get ready for the next go-around, right? Not so fast! Your gifting breather may be short-lived, as the spring gifting season is just around the corner!

I’m talking about holidays like Valentine’s Day, Mother’s Day and Easter. Spring is the season for bridal showers, baby showers and graduations, not to mention the unending parade of birthdays and other occasions for celebration. It does seem as though there is no end to the situations and occasions that we need a small and understated but lovely gift. I have a wonderful solution for your consideration.
Gifting friends, family members, co-workers, teachers and others with your own signature hand and body lotion will definitely put you on the map. It’s that good.
Not particularly crafty? No worries. If you can assemble, empty, stir and mix well, you’ve got what it takes to make dozens of these gifts start to finish in a single evening. The best part is it costs about $3.50 per gift depending on where you buy the ingredients and containers.
Here’s the routine: Purchase the ingredients, mix them together, divide between your choice of small containers, apply a label or gift tag and embellish with a ribbon. There you go. Done in no time.

HAND AND BODY LOTION
–Any 8-ounce tube of Bath & Body Works Ultra Shea Body Cream (This year, I’m using its new fragrance, A Thousand Wishes, because it is fabulous. It costs about $12. You need this high-quality shea cream as the base for your product.)
–Any brand 4-ounce jar vitamin E cream (costs about $6)
–Any brand 18-ounce fragrance-free baby lotion (costs about $6)
–Any brand 32-ounce fragrance-free hand lotion (costs about $7)
–One 4.5-ounce tube Vaseline Jelly Cream (costs about $4)
–Any 4-ounce lotion jars with lids (costs about $14 per dozen)

TOOLS
–Large mixing bowl.
–Electric mixer or hand whisk.
–Gallon-size zip-close bag or other plastic bag.

INSTRUCTIONS
–Empty the five ingredients into the bowl.
–Using an electric hand mixer or whisk, mix together until well-incorporated, or about five minutes.
–Fill a large zip-close bag with the lotion. Close the top. Using scissors, snip off a small portion of one of the bottom corners to create a simple piping bag.
–Fill your jars or containers by gently squeezing the lotion from the piping bag.
–Give your signature lotion a name. Create small labels or tags with your message of choice.
–Embellish as desired.
That’s it. You’ve got beautiful homemade gifts that will be very well-received due to their high quality. Because all of the ingredients except for the shea cream are unscented or nearly so, your lotion will have a very light, subtle fragrance — not overpowering or offensive but simply lovely.
This recipe, as stated, yields about 16 4-ounce jars of fine hand and body lotion. You can find pictures and links to products at www.everydaycheapskate.com/bodylotion. Your volume may vary depending on how long and vigorously you whip the lotion. Be careful to not make it too fluffy. I find that no more than five minutes is ideal.
Enjoy!
Mary invites questions, comments and tips at mary@everydaycheapskate.com, or c/o Everyday Cheapskate, 12340 Seal Beach Blvd., Suite B-416, Seal Beach, CA 90740. This column will answer questions of general interest, but letters cannot be answered individually. Mary Hunt is the founder of www.DebtProofLiving.com, a personal finance member website and the author of “Debt-Proof Living,” released in 2014. To find out more about Mary and read her past columns, please visit the Creators Syndicate webpage at www.creators.com.
COPYRIGHT 2017 CREATORS.COM

 

 

 

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