Former Governor Madeleine Kunin Guest Speaker at Aging in Vermont Conference Oct. 26

October 4, 2018  
Filed under News

In just over a decade from now, one in 4 people who live in Vermont will be turning 65. That means that we all have to re-think and re-frame aging in ways that we may not have considered prior to now. We all have to come together to think about healthy living and successful aging in more wholistic ways.

 

One way we are going about this exciting challenge is through our upcoming Aging in Vermont: Healthy Living Conference to be held on Oct. 26, 2018 in Killington. The conference features 10 presentations led by nearly two dozen experts, 30 exhibitors and over 300 attendees. We will all learn from keynote speaker, Sandy Markwood, the Chief Executive Officer of the National Association of Area Agencies on Aging about the shift from medical-based clinical care to a recognition of the value of home and community-based services and supports. We will find out together – what the aging network have known all along – that new and exciting opportunities are emerging for us to partner with the health care system to promote healthy aging.

 

The Aging in Vermont: Healthy Living Conference will provide a variety of opportunities for all of us to celebrate aging by learning:

  • how to talk about aging through reframing our conversations
  • how Tai-Chi has a direct impact on falls prevention and overall healthy aging and that we can have access Tai-Chi activities in several areas throughout Vermont
  • that you can age in place without isolation
  • that we can all make a difference by getting involved with policy-making.

There are several more topics to be presented; something for everyone.

 

On top of what has been organized for the conference, special guest, former Governor Madeleine Kunin will share her new book, Coming of Age. The timing is perfect for this book to be launched and that she can share this with the attendees during the Aging in Vermont Conference. Madeleine Kunin writes, “My memoir takes the scattered events and thoughts of my life and sorts them within the covers of a book. It creates the happy illusion that life is an organized whole.”

 

State Representative Theresa A.M. Wood who is one of the conference’s presenters says, “Former Governor Madeleine Kunin embodies successful aging.  Throughout her life, including in later years, she has remained a vibrant leader and mentor.  I am delighted she will share her most recent work Coming of Age at the upcoming Aging in Vermont conference.”

 

Janet Hunt, Executive Director for the Vermont Association of Area Agencies and main organizer for the Aging in Vermont Conference says, “I am thrilled that so many dedicated individuals representing our aging network throughout Vermont are coming together for our conference to celebrate what we care about so deeply; older Vermonters. To have such expert presenters from throughout the state, plus, Sandy Markwood, a nationally known leader, and to host special guest, former Governor Madeleine Kunin as she launches her new book, Coming of Age promises to be a monumental day!”

 

Coming of Age by Madeleine Kunin will be available for sale at the conference through Phoenix Books.

 

For information about the conference, please visit http://vermont4a.org/conference.

Is Staying in Their Home Really the Best Choice for Retirees?

October 4, 2018  
Filed under Aging Parents, News

When asked, many retirees express a strong preference for staying in their home as long as possible. After all, it is often where they raised their children and is located near their faith community and familiar shopping spots. In her new book, Your Home Sweet Home, financial planner Penelope Tzougros helps people dispassionately evaluate whether staying put or going makes the best economic sense.

Tzougros shares the stories, insights, fears and clever solutions her clients made when facing the same dilemma. She also presents analytical tools, worksheets and a Decision Guide to create a step-by-step process for sorting out fears, facts and finances.

“Ultimately,” she says, “this is not a real estate decision but a decision about what retirees need to have the best life possible.” She adds, “And the reality is that when a house’s maintenance costs are draining people’s savings, it is no longer an asset.”

Extensively interviewed on TV, radio and in print, Tzougros produced and directed the television show Money Makeover. She has worked with thousands of retirees and is known for her ability to explain complicated financial concepts with elegant simplicity. She can discuss:

  • How to figure out if your home is the cheapest place you can live.
  • Calculating the relative costs of different housing options – and why almost everyone makes critical miscalculations.
  • The biggest mistakes seniors make when considering whether to stay in their home or move.
  • Whether you stay or move, critical timing mistakes to avoid.
  • The true and hidden costs of moving vs. maintaining your house.
  • How to move beyond your inevitable fears and discover clever solutions that can serve your long-term interests.

About the Author

Penelope S. Tzougros, Ph.D., ChFC, CLU, is a Financial Consultant, author, speaker and founder of Wealthy Choices, a Registered Investment Advisor. Although she is based in Boston, she is registered in all 50 states and offers securities and advisory services through LPL Financial, Member FINRA/SIPC. In addition to Your Home Sweet Home, she is the author of Wealthy Choices: The Seven Competencies of Financial Success, and Long-term Care Insurance: How to Make Decisions That Are Right for You. Tzougros holds a master’s degree from Harvard, a doctorate from the University of Toronto, and has taught at Northeastern University and Hellenic College.

Taking Control of Stress and Menopause Symptoms

September 27, 2018  
Filed under Health & Wellness, News

It’s another one of those chicken-or-the-egg dilemmas…do bothersome menopause symptoms create stress or does stress bring on menopause symptoms? The correct answer might not matter since a new study suggests that higher mindfulness may lower stress and the impact of menopause-related symptoms such as hot flashes. Study results will be presented during The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) Annual Meeting in San Diego, October 3-6, 2018.

Mindfulness has been a topic of increased popularity in recent years. Long-practiced in Far Eastern cultures, it has only recently gained attention in the West. The practice of mindfulness, which allows patients to be aware of the present moment, without concern for past or future consequences, calmly accepting their feelings about the present event or person, has been touted by some in the medical field as one of the most important developments in the mental health discipline in the past 20 years.

Thanks to a new study out of the Mayo Clinic, enhancing mindfulness may now be considered a viable treatment option for helping midlife women deal with stress and bothersome menopause-related symptoms. The cross-sectional study of 1,744 women aged 40-65 years showed that higher mindfulness correlated with lower menopause symptom scores, as well as lower stress scores in this population. A correlation was seen between higher menopause symptom scores and higher perceived stress. In women with higher stress, the benefits of mindfulness on menopause symptom scores were even more significant.

“Although more research is needed, this study provides a strong signal for the potential role of mindfulness in improving psychological symptoms, emotional response to menopause symptoms, and stress in women during midlife,” says Dr. Richa Sood, lead author of the study from the Mayo Clinic.

“This study provides encouraging results as it demonstrates that women may have a tool to help them control stress and menopause symptoms and improve their overall quality of life,” says Dr. JoAnn Pinkerton, NAMS executive director.

 

The trust older patients place in doctors can compromise their medical care: study

September 13, 2018  
Filed under Aging Parents, News

Placing trust in doctors to advocate for their health needs, older adults rarely ask for referrals to specialists, specific prescriptions, express concerns or follow-up after medical visits, according to a new study from Case Western Reserve University.

The findings highlight a disconnect between the expectations of older adults and the realities of a changing health-care system, where doctors have less time to spend with patients.

“These findings are concerning,” said Eva Kahana, Distinguished University Professor and Pierce T. and Elizabeth D. Robson Professor of the Humanities at Case Western Reserve. “Our data suggests older generations are clinging to how health care used to be, when doctors had more personal relationships and continuity with patients.”

“When patients incorrectly assume actions and advocacy by doctors, this leads to major problems,” Kahana said, “especially for older adults living with one of more chronic illnesses, such as diabetes and high blood-pressure.”

The study shows that older adults (defined as 65 and older) are less likely to advocate for their own health concerns the more they trust the role is being taken on by their doctors.

The findings are especially relevant for minorities and the sickest of patients, who have less access to health care and face particular challenges in finding responsive care, according to previous research.

Among of the study’s other findings:

  • Older adults who feel comfortable advocating for their own care feel more empowered;
  • Compared to white patients, African-American patients were less satisfied with their physicians;
  • Latino patients expressed greater satisfaction with their medical care than white and African-American patients;
  • The perceived emotional support of physicians was associated with patients’ satisfaction.

“Our findings strongly suggest that families of older patients should be ready to step in as advocates for their older relatives,” Kahana said. “And it’s helpful for doctors to be more aware of how older patients see them.”

Published in the journal Clinical Interventions in Aging, the study is based on data from a diverse pool of 806 older adults from a large retirement community in Clearwater, Florida, and others in Orlando, Miami and Cleveland, where Case Western Reserve is located.

Read more

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED FOR AARP FOUNDATION TAX-AIDE PROGRAM

September 12, 2018  
Filed under Money, News

 

AARP Tax-Aide Wants You!

 

Want to volunteer to help neighbors in your community?  Want to be engaged in a meaningful way?  Want to give back?  AARP Tax-Aide is looking for volunteers for the upcoming tax season. Tax-Aide volunteers make a difference in their communities by assisting many older, lower-income taxpayers who might otherwise miss out on the credits and deductions they’ve earned. Volunteers receive training and support in a welcoming environment.

 

In addition to tax preparers, there are several important positions that help the program run successfully that don’t require tax knowledge:

-Technology Coordinator

– Site Coordinator

– Electronic Returns Originator

-Volunteer Recruiting Specialist

-Communications Specialist

 

Following the training most positions require 4-8 hours a week during the tax season but most schedules can be accommodated. There are tax sites throughout Vermont.

 

In Vermont last year, 187 AARP Tax-Aide volunteers helped more than 14,400 people file their federal and state tax returns. The program is offered at approximately 35 sites in Vermont, including senior centers, libraries and other convenient locations. Older Vermonters received some $4.4 million in tax refunds as a resulted of this program.

 

To learn about our volunteer opportunities, contact kathiebtv@comcast.net or visit www.aarpfoundation.org/taxaide . AARP Foundation Tax-Aide is offered in coordination with the IRS.

 

Vermont State Women’s Golf Association

July 26, 2018  
Filed under Health & Wellness, News

Press Release – July 20, 2018

 

Parker Wins 10th Senior Women’s Golf Title

 

Defending champion Reggie Parker of Ekwanok Country Club in Manchester captured her 10th Vermont Senior Women’s Amateur golf title and the Ruth Raymond Jones memorial trophy this week at the Ralph Myhre Golf Course in Middlebury.

 

Parker went into the final day of play with a 3-stroke lead over Mary Brush of Burlington CC and held steady, finishing with a 2-day total 160 to Brush’s 164. Brush was awarded the Loretta Tupper Lillie Runner-up trophy. Nancy Devaux of West Bolton Golf Club, playing in her first Senior championship, finished in third place with 168.

 

Parker also won the Mary R. Emans Legend trophy for low gross score among players 70 years and older. Susie Bremner of Rocky Ridge GC won the Dolores Frenier Messier Super Senior trophy in the 65-69 age category.

 

The low Net winner was Lois Forester of Brattleboro CC. Williston GC and Burlington CC, always strong contenders, were the co-winners of the Pat Job Cup team competition. The first day featured a low-putt contest, which was won by Cathy Neff of Vermont National CC with just 26 putts.

 

The Ruth Raymond Jones Memorial Seniors’ Championship began in 1966. The event is open to women golfers 55 years and older who are Vermont residents or who belong to a Vermont real estate golf club.

Seventy women from around the state participated this year and enjoyed two perfect days of golf weather and the camaraderie of their fellow competitors.

 

Full field results and photos are available at www.vswga.org

 

 

 

New Consumer Brochure from National Reverse Mortgage Lenders Association Helps Seniors Spot and Stop Financial Abuse

June 19, 2018  
Filed under Money, News

The National Reverse Mortgage Lenders Association is proud to participate in World Elder Abuse Awareness Day today with the release of a new consumer brochure, Recognize & Report Elder Financial Abuse.  The free tri-fold brochure, available for download from NRMLA’s consumer education website athttps://www.reversemortgage.org/ReportFraud, helps seniors, and their loved ones, avoid common scams, spot signs of elder fraud and exploitation, and stop and report wrongdoing.

“As professionals who serve older homeowners, we have a special responsibility to ensure the safety and fair treatment of seniors,” said NRMLA Executive Vice President Steve Irwin. “NRMLA’s new brochure, which we encourage all members to print and share widely, is another example of our work to raise awareness about the increasing number of financial crimes perpetrated against seniors and steps we can all take to report mistreatment.”

Each year, an estimated five million, or one in ten, older Americans are victims of elder abuse, neglect or exploitation. According to the National Center on Elder Abuse, the annual financial loss by victims of elder financial exploitation was estimated to be $2.9 billion in 2009, a 12 percent increase from 2008.

Common signs highlighted in NRMLA’s Recognize & Report Elder Financial Abuse brochure include unpaid bills, eviction notices, or notices to discontinue utilities; withdrawals from bank accounts or transfers between accounts that the older person cannot explain; new “best friends;” legal documents, such as powers of attorney, which the older person didn’t understand at the time he or she signed them; and a caregiver who expresses excessive interest in the amount of money being spent on the older person.

If the situation appears threatening or dangerous, NRMLA advises readers to call 911 or the local police for immediate help.

World Elder Abuse Awareness Day was launched on June 15, 2006 by the International Network for the Prevention of Elder Abuse and the World Health Organization at the United Nations. WEAAD aims to provide an opportunity for communities around the world to promote a better understanding of abuse and neglect of older persons by raising awareness of the cultural, social, economic, and demographic processes affecting elder abuse and neglect.

 

VT SENIOR GAMES ASSOCIATION ANNOUNCES SUMMER SEASON OF EVENTS

June 19, 2018  
Filed under Health & Wellness, News

Hundreds of VT athletes over 50 get ready for major summer competitions

 

The Vermont Senior Games Association (VSGA), a program of the Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports, announces its summer season of competitive athletic events for people over 50.

Read more

Burlington Edible History Tour 2018 Season Opens June 14

May 31, 2018  
Filed under Food, Money, News

Burlington Edible History tours, rated five stars on Trip Advisor, begin June 14 for its fourth full season.

 

Over a 1.5-mile walk, participants discover the local history and food traditions of 11 immigrant groups that built Burlington: Abenaki, African Americans, French Canadians, Germans, Greeks, Irish, Italians, Chinese, Jews, Lebanese, and Yankees.

 

Tour groups sample food at five restaurants that serve local foods. This year we are delighted to welcome two new restaurants – The Gryphon and Deli 126. They join Penny Cluse, Sugarsnap Catering at ECHO, and Monarch and the Milkweed at Maglianero.

The Gryphon is located in the first Hotel Vermont, once Burlington’s largest and most prestigious hotel, and the Deli 126 is a New York-style deli combined with a 1920s style jazz cocktail lounge.

Deli 126 Bar General Manager Emily Morton enthuses, “We are a great match with Burlington Edible History. We’re both excited to let people experience our local food and drink history. Elise and Gail discovered the existence of the Good Templars and Vermont Anti-Saloon League offices on this block and the next, two groups that pushed to prohibit the sale of liquor.”

 

Tours run Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays, 1:00 – 4:15pm, through October 13. Tickets must be purchased in advance through Seven Days Tickets via their website at www.sevendaystickets.com or through the Tour’s website at www.burlingtonediblehistory.com.

 

The tour donates 10% of profits to New Farms for New Americans to help new immigrants and refugees stay connected to their culinary traditions. Burlington Edible History Tour is the only Vermont destination in the tourism blog Roaming the Americas on “How to Support Immigrants and Refugees Through Travel in the United States.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10 Tips to ACE Your Posture

May 29, 2018  
Filed under Health & Wellness, News

 

Stand Taller

Mom was right, posture is important, especially as we spend our days hunched over phones and computers.  Poor posture strains muscles and joints, and is linked to back and neck pain, as well as overall stress and even depression.  Plus slumping makes you look older.

 

HEre are 10 tips to ACE your posture  from PostureMonth.org to build new habits and retrain posture by improving your body Awareness; taking Control of how you sit, stand and move; and designing the postural Environment right for you.

 

10 Tips to ACE Your Posture

 

“A” is for AWARENESS

 

1. Take a picture:  Seeing how you really look is a great incentive to improving posture.  Check your alignment compared to a line through the middle of your head, shoulders, hips and ankles.  Any camera works for front and side pics, or use the free PostureZone app for any mobile device to visualize and track exactly how your body stacks up.

 

2. Get moving:  Take posture breaks throughout the day.  Set a reminder to get up and stretch, or try a postural exercise like the ones below.  Moving your body every 90 minutes or so will make a big difference in how you feel at the end of the day.

 

“C” is for CONTROL

 

3. Ground your feet: Lift your heels and come up on your toes, then lift your toes to come up on heels and spread toes. Roll onto the outside edge and then the inside edge of each foot.  Press down on all four corners of both feet to connect with the ground.

 

4. Center your pelvis:  Core exercise is not just for the gym.  Lengthen your spine with a gentle low back arch and tuck.  Repeat for 5 cycles to wake up and reset neglected muscles during your day.

 

5. Open your chest:  Lift your shoulders all the way up, then roll them back, and then release them down.  Repeat 5 times to open your chest and relax your spine.

 

6. Level your head:  Imagine a balloon gently lifting the top of your head toward the sky.  Keep your head level and focus on a spot directly in front of you to retrain the deep muscles that align your neck.

 

7. Take 5 Breaths: Belly breathing with your diaphragm is key to strengthening posture.  Lengthen your body and spine with 5 slow, aware breaths to let your shoulders relax and clear your mind.

 

“E” is for ENVIRONMENT

 

8. Adjust it: There’s no one single perfect posture position, and your body is designed to move.  So change it up.  Consider a desk that lets you stand up or sit down to keep moving throughout the day. Instead of an office chair, try sitting on a ball or a pelvic for a couple of hours. When taking long trips, adjust your car seat each time you stop. When texting, lift your phone up to eye-level instead of folding your head down.

 

9. Sit strong: Adjust the rear-view mirror in your car so you have to sit tall with upright posture to see. Change the angle of your computer monitor or lift it a bit higher to reduce stress on neck muscles.

 

10. Stand taller: Head up, shoulders down and pelvis engaged gives you more height and less girth.  Plus people with strong posture often feel less pain, look younger and feel more confident!

 

Recheck your posture (Tip 1) a few times a year to keep track of your improvement.  VisitPostureMonth.org for more ideas to ACE Your Posture.

 

 

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